Don’t tarry or waste time: you get just one life, so grasp the nettle and make the most of it. A perverse irony hovers over the speaker's opening command, "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may." Of course, even worse is its agist stance. One further irony regarding this poem: the poet, Robert Herrick, never married! Question: What would happen to the argument in Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," if we were to rearrange the first three stanzas? Observe how older political candidates are treated. Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May is an oil painting on canvas created in 1909 by British Pre-Raphaelite artist, John William Waterhouse. It is obvious that the redundancy is committed for the purpose of adhering a rime onto the third line: "The sooner will his race be run." And while in reality there is no such thing as "setting" for the sun, the beauty of the poor little virgins will, in fact, run its course and set and then they are screwed (ironic pun intended)! It is obvious that the redundancy is committed for the purpose of adhering a rime onto the third line: "The sooner will his race be run.". That age is best which is the first, Robert Herrick's poem, "To the Virgins to Make Much of Time," is spewing out an egregious conglomeration of both sexism and ageism, as the speaker urges young women to get married while they are still young, fresh, warm, and lovely enough to attract a mate. You become exceedingly dull. Irony notwithstanding, the speaker surely is also suggesting that his listeners think of "rosebuds" metaphorically for marriage. Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying: And this same flower that smiles to-day To-morrow will be dying. And for a woman to die with hymen in tact is a dreadful, dastardly situation! Old Time is still a-flying; The speaker thus wants to compare the virgin's run through life to the sun's run through the heavens during the day. Marriage results in the deflowering of men and women as they engage in sexual intercourse. Of course, of a young man in his early forties, no one would think to question the health status. Tomorrow will be dying. However, even today "agism" is alive and well and unnoticed as denigrating even by the most ardent politically correct. By entering your email address you agree to receive emails from Shmoop and verify that you are over the age of 13. (Please note: The spelling, "rhyme," was introduced into English by Dr. Samuel Johnson through an etymological error. Answer: The speaker is urging young women to get married while they are still young, fresh, warm, and lovely enough to attract a man. The "rosebuds" are beautiful in youth, but they will be withering up soon and "dying." [1][2], Lost for nearly a century, this painting was in an old Canadian farmhouse bought by a couple who requested the painting stay with the house because "It looked nice on the wall." And while in reality there is no such thing as "setting" for the sun, the beauty of the poor little virgins will, in fact, run its course and set and then they are screwed (ironic pun intended)! If you live to be old—especially if you are a woman, and more especially if you are a woman without a husband—your spinsterhood will drag you through your life like a mouse caught in cat's mouth. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he’s a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he’s to setting. The older you are the worse your life becomes. The artwork was valued at $1.75–2.5 million by Sotheby's prior to auction in April 2007, although the painting went unsold. GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying: And this same flower that smiles to-day To-morrow will be dying. It was the second of two paintings inspired by the 17th century poem "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick which begins: Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, That age is best which is the first, Yes, ageism is alive and well in the American Twenty-First Century. To-morrow will be dying. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time Gather ye rose-buds while ye may, That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Today if even mentioned, his health record might be disqualifying. .". Answer: In Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," there are two examples of personification: "this same flower that smiles" and "sooner will his race be run.". The higher the sun moves the closer he is to setting. Question: Comment on the efficacy of Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" as a carpe diem poem? Question: Does the speaker's advice in Robert Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," still apply today in the twenty-first century? The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, 5 The higher he 's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he 's to setting. He might have in mind even the nosegay held by brides as they trundle down the aisle to join their grooms for the taking of the marriage vows. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting.

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