Hi Fateme, if you’ve heard the question phrased like that then it is colloquial, not sticking to proper grammar – it should have an auxiliary, “How do you love to hate me?” (More accurately would probably be ‘Why do…’, or if we’re asking for an amount/degree, ‘How much do…’; it might also be ‘How is it that you love…’) Hi Fahad, “What country does he belong to?” is correct because we add “do/does” before a bare infinitive (belong) to form a present simple question. Peace be upon you! Is it necessary to use the question form in these kind of sentences in an informal conversation too? You couldn’t help him in the garden, could you? James is working on that, isn't he? If there is an auxiliary verb in the statement, we use it to form the question tag. E.g. They are put at the end of the sentence. If the sentence is positive, the question tag must be negative. Formation. We really enjoyed them. If the sentence is negative, the question tag must be positive. PAGE GRAMMAR-GUIDE ( the verb to do as an auxiliary and a main verb, do as a phrasal verb with meanings and examples and collocations with do) Level: intermediate Age: 12-17 So a first person singular statement becomes a third person question: For third person statements this will make no difference to conjugation. If the sentence is negative, the question tag will be affirmative. These questions are used to ask about the subject, not the object. The car is parked outside. The train arrives at 5 o’clock. When the question word is the subject there is no auxiliary verb … When we are asking a yes/no question, or looking for information about an object (i.e. The only complication here is that question words can change the conjugation of the verb. Could you explain? Join the ELB Reader's Group to receive FREE English learning material sent directly to your inbox. Yes, they were. What country does he belong to? They should learn for the test, shouldn’t they? The first question is a normal question and uses the form which we almost always use for a question: question word + auxiliary + subject + verb. They have used all the paper. Click a cover to learn more! Yes you can use tag questions like that, that’s fine – conversationally we often talk that way. I am playing tennis this afternoon. When the question word is the subject there is no auxiliary verb and the verb agrees with the subject. PART 3: DO - ! E.g. I don't need to finish this today, do I? Hi -> Had it been sitting there for hours? Learn how your comment data is processed. There is a new restaurant next to your company, isn’t there? In spoken English, depending on regional and cultural variations, the auxiliaries are often dropped in this way, but we can trace back to what the sentence would look like with complete grammar. When we are making question tags without the verb “to be”, we usually use the auxiliary verb “do” to ask for confirmation. I had to work in the office. I send out at least two emails a month sharing new articles and curating existing lessons, and if you sign up now you'll get a set of grammar worksheets, too. Question tags are used in spoken English, but not in written English. What are you doing this afternoon? He completed his homework. They follow a different form to regular questions, because the question word replaces the subject. If the sentence is positive, the question tag must be negative. However, question words can replace either an object or a subject in sentences – and when this happens, questions may be formed without … Questions in English are usually formed by either inverting the verb and subject, or by adding an auxiliary verb before the subject (and putting the main verb in bare infinitive form). If there isn’t an auxiliary or modal verb, use do, does or did. What time does the train arrive? Their form is actually simpler than regular questions, as you just have to replace the subject with a question word and add a question mark. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Question tags are used in spoken English, but not in written English. Auxiliary verbs worksheets: SUPER ENGLISH VERBS! Examples: You don’t drink, do you? The first question is a normal question and uses the form which we almost always use for a question: question word + auxiliary + subject + verb. We don’t need to add an auxiliary as they already have auxiliaries (will / to be). Question tags are short questions at the end of statements. Join our Patreon team to keep ELB producing new and better content, and you’ll receive exclusive benefits. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. In the second question, the question word is the subject. They are put at the end of the sentence.

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